Details of this Paper

The Properties Water

Description

solution


Question

Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;The Properties;Water;of;Margaret E. Vorndam;M.S. Version 42-012900-01;LAB REPORT ASSISTANT;This document is not meant to be a substitute for a formal laboratory report. The Lab;Report Assistant is simply a summary of the experiments questions, diagrams if;needed, and data tables that should be addressed in a formal lab report. The intent is to;facilitate students writing of lab reports by providing this information in an editable file;which can be sent to an instructor.;Exercise;Tension;1;Surface;RESULTS;A. State your hypothesis. What do you think will;happen?;Table 1: Results of Surface Tension Trials;Trial #;1;2;3;4;5 Compacted;6 + Detergent;(optional);Paper Clip Weight;grams;m;34;Does it Float? Yes/No;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;B. Record the results of your trials in the Data Table 1 above.;C. Did the weight of the paper clip affect whether it floated or;not? D. Did the size of the paper clip affect whether it floated;or not?;E. Did the shape of the paper clip affect whether it floated or not?;F. Optional: Did the addition of detergent influence the flotation of the paper clip? Explain.;QUESTIONS;A. Why must the paper clips, tweezers, and bowl be;clean? B. If one paper clip did not float, what might be;a reason?;C. Was your original hypothesis supported or refuted?;DISCUSSION;A. Give two examples where the surface tension of water is important. Why is it;important in these examples?;m;35;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;B. Would other liquids have the same surface tension property? Why or why not?;How might you test this (for instance, the behavior of a paper clip and olive oil)?;C. Is there a limit to the tensile strength of the water surface? Explain.;D. What experimental variables are important to consider when doing this;exercise? E. What is the purpose of this exercise?;Exercise 2: Capillary Action;RESULTS;A. State your hypothesis. What do you think will;happen? B. Record the results of your exercise in;the Data Table 2.;Table 2: Results of Capillary Action Exercise;Capillary Tube Internal Diameter, mm Height of Liquid;cm;m;36;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;C. Record the average results of at least three other students exercises in a table like;Table 3. Why is it important to note how many data sets (N) are used in the average?;N (number;averaged) =;of;data;sets;Table 3: Results of;Capillary;Action;Capillary Tube;Internal;Diameter, mm;Height of;Liquid, cm;D. Graph your data results from Tables 1 and 2 in a scatter graph, line graph, or bar;graph similar to the graph layout in Figure 1. Also present the average results of the;other students data using a second scatter, line or bar on the same graph so that the;results of both your data and other students data can be compared. The graph should;present two series of data, your results and the average students results, with Capillary;Tube Internal Diameter on the x-axis, and height of liquid on the y-axis. Note: Do the;graph by hand, or you may use a graphing program, and copy the resulting graph to;your work area. Place your graph here;E. What is the advantage of comparing your data to that of the other students data?;Which set of data would you trust the most? Why?;m;37;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;My data from Table 1 is recorded in;(student to specify color of line);Other students average data from Table 2 are recorded in (student to specify color;of line);QUESTIONS;A. What did you observe at the end time of the exercise?;B. What caused the difference in the results that you obtained?;C. How did your outcome compare to that of the other students?;m;38;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;D. Was there a linear relationship between Internal Diameter and the height of the;water? What might explain this?;E.;Was your original hypothesis supported or;refuted?;DISCUSSION;A. Give two examples where the capillary action of water is important. Why is it;important?;B. Would other liquids have the same property? Why or why not? How might you;test this?;C. Blood in our bodies travels through capillaries of differing internal diameters. This;means that our heart can work less hard, since blood contains water as part of the fluid;and the capillary action of water in tubes helps to move the blood along.;1. Why does blood pressure rise as patients experience the progression of;atherosclerotic disease?;Does this seem to be counter to what you have learned about capillary action?;How do you explain the apparent discrepancy (note: see also c., below)?;m;39;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;2.;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;In plants, vascular system elements called xylem and phloem are lined up like;long straws from the root of the plant to the leaves. The xylem of plants moves;water and dissolved nutrients up to the leaves. Can you suggest what aids the;movement of water up the plant, in addition to the capillary action of water?;3. Why is it harder to suck a beverage through a small diameter straw than through;a large diameter straw?;4. What experimental variables are important to consider when doing this exercise?;What could explain the difference in outcomes between your data and the data;of other students?;5. What is the purpose of this exercise?;Exercise 3: Density;RESULTS;A. State your hypothesis. What do you think will happen?;B. Record what actually happened here;m;40;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;QUESTIONS;A. What did you observe in this exercise?;B. How does this outcome compare to what you observe about the action of ice (the;solid form of water) on liquid water?;C. Was your original hypothesis supported or refuted?;DISCUSSION;A. Why is it important that ice floats?;B. Give two examples where the property of water density is important.;C. Do all solids float on their liquid forms? Why or why not?;D. The density of liquid olive oil is about 0.92. What can you say about the likely density;of solid oil? Why?;E. Will olive oil float or sink if it is added to liquid water? Why?;m;41;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;F. What experimental variables are important to consider when doing this exercise?;G. Attempt to find another pure substance, like water or oil, in which the solid form;floats on the liquid form (Note: do not spend more than 5 minutes on this question!).;H. What did you learn from this exercise?;Exercise 4: Specific Heat Capacity;RESULTS;A. State your hypothesis. What do you think will happen?;B. What difference do you observe in the heights of the frozen solid oil and water as;compared to the liquid forms prior to freezing? What might explain this result?;m;42;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;C. Record what actually happened in a table similar to Tables 4 and 5;Table 4: Results of Specific Heat Exercise for;Water;Ambient (Room);Temperature;Time, minutes;Liquid Collected;mL;All solid ice;gone;m;43;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;Table 5: Results of Specific Heat Exercise;for Oil;Ambient (Room);Temperature;in Which Exercise was Conducted;Time, minutes Liquid Collected, mL;All solid oil;gone;m;44;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;D. Graph your data results from Table 4 and 5 in a graph like Figure 2. Use a scatter;graph or progressive line graph, with Time noted on the x-axis, and mL of liquid;collected on the y-axis. You should have two scatter plots or lines on your graph (not;two separate graphs) one for water and one for oil. Note: you may use a graphing;program, and copy the resulting graph to your work area. Place your graph here;E. Calculate the melting rate for each of water and oil. The melting rate is equal to;the slope of each of the separate lines of your graph, one for water, and one for oil. The;easiest way to calculate the slope for each is to use your graphing program, and ask it to;determine the trendline for you, as follows;F. Share your melting rate for water and the oil with other students, if possible. Make;sure to also obtain the ambient (room) temperature from the other students. Why?;m;45;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;Table 6: Comparison of Melting Rates for Specific Heat Exercise;Results Reported;By;Student;Student A;Student B;Student C;Student D;Average =;Water, mL/min;m;Oil, mL/min;46;Hands-On Labs;General Ambient;Temperature, C.;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;QUESTIONS;A. Was your original hypothesis supported or refuted?;B. What do you observe concerning the plot line of the oil versus the plot line of the;water? What does this mean?;C. How close is your melting rate to the melting rates reported by at least three other;students for the water and for the oil?;D. Generally, what might you conclude about the amount of specific heat needed to melt 50 mL;of water versus 50 mL of oil?;E. How could you explain the differences in your data observations as to when the;water and oil began to melt?;F. What experimental variables are important to consider when doing this exercise?;What could explain the difference in outcomes between your data and the data of other;students?;m;47;Hands-On Labs;Experiment;THE PROPERTIES OF WATER;DISCUSSION;A. How might you design a similar experiment to determine whether the specific heat;(amount of heat required to raise 1 gram of a material by 1 C) of one substance is more;or less than another substance? What variables must you consider in the design of;your experiment? Give an example of such an experiment that compares the specific;heats for two different substances.;B. An alternative energy-savvy person decides to use 55 gallon drums filled with liquid;to warm her house at night in the winter. She has to make a decision about what liquid;will be the most efficient at storing heat from sunlight that shines on the drums during;the day. Should she use water or oil in the drums? Why?;LABORATORY SUMMARY;What have you learned from doing this;laboratory?

 

Paper#15082 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

Price : $57
SiteLock