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Before beginning, set up a data table similar to the Data Tables in the Lab Report Assistant section.

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Before beginning, set up a data table similar to the Data Tables in the Lab Report Assistant section.;1. Select 5 or 6 large hard-bound books of roughly equal weight from a text book collection.;2. Optional: If a bathroom scale is available weigh each book and record the weights into the;data table.;3. Remove the end cap of the syringe spout and pull the piston approximately to the 60 mL;position.;4. Place the end cap onto the syringe spout and push down on the piston with your hand slowly;and steadily until the volume of the trapped gas is reduced to approximately 20 mL. Release;the piston and note whether it returns to the initial volume. Perform this test several times.;The position to which the piston returns each time will be your starting position. The gas;trapped in the syringe is at approximately the same pressure as the ambient surroundings.;5. Record this volume at Volume Trial 1 at 0 (zero books) into Data Table 1.;6. Place the base board of the Boyle?s Law apparatus on a flat, steady surface, such as a sturdy;table or the floor.;Figure 2: Syringe and base board;7. Place the syringe onto the base support board so that the syringe spout points downward.;NOTE: The base board has been drilled to accommodate the shape of the pointed end of the;syringe spout.;8. Place the other wooden board onto the top of the piston while supporting the apparatus with;one hand. Optionally have a partner hold the syringe and top board.;Experiment Boyle?s Law;Figure 3: Top and base boards in place with books stacked on top to produce pressure;9. Place one book onto the board above the piston and record the resulting gas volume at;Volume Trial 1 at 1 (one book) into Data Table 1. In order to read the volume of trapped gas;always read the measurement on the side of the piston that is in contact with the gas.;10. Place a second book onto the first book, allow the books to settle on the piston, and record;the changed gas volume.;11. Continue adding books and recording the resulting volumes until all 5 or 6 books are resting;on the board. Remember to steady the books, especially when the apparatus is being read.;12. Remove all the books from the piston and reset the apparatus to the initial volume recorded;in Step 3.;13. Repeat Steps 7 ? 10 two more times to complete the data for a total of three trials. Remember;to reset the apparatus as instructed in Step 3 between each trial.;Calculations, Graphing & Analysis;1. Find the average of each set of three volumes and record these averages into Data Table 1;Average Volume column.;2. Calculate the inverse 1/Vavg (mL-1) of each average volume and record these values into Data;Table 1.;3. Using the graphing function of your spreadsheet prepare a graph of ?Pressure (Number of;Books) Vs Volume (mL)? with ?Pressure? on the y-axis and ?Volume? on the x?axis.;4. Prepare a second graph showing pressure (number of books or weight) on the y-axis vs. 1/;Volume on the x axis. Boyle?s Law states that gas Pressure x Volume = a constant (k), PV=k or;V=k/P. Therefore, volume varies inversely with pressure. Thus the graph of the gas pressure;values (Y axis) to values of the inverse of the volume (X axis) should show as a straight line;with a slope of ?k?. Use the trend line function of the graphing software to have Excel put;the equation of the line directly on the graph (y = mx + b). ?b? is the value where the line;intersects with the y-axis and roughly represents the atmospheric pressure in the units used;on the pressure axis? books, etc.;Experiment Boyle?s Law;NOTE: Remember that air pressure around us is 14.7 lbs/in2? 101kPa, 760 mmHg or 1,035 g/;cm2? at sea level (one atmospheric pressure) and the added mass from the plunger itself ? while;negligible ? will increase the pressure further. The slope line obtained for the second plot crosses;the y-axis of the graph above or below the origin, which tells us that there is pressure on the gas;even when there are no books on the piston.;IMPORTANT: Make certain to verify with your instructor whether they have any special;requirements for creating the graphs. Depending on your instructor?s requirements, the graphs;can be plotted in book units or converted to pressure units.;5. The local atmospheric pressure obtained through the above method must be added to all;pressure readings to obtain Total Pressure PT. Record Total Pressure PT into the data table;corresponding to each Pressure (Number of Books).;6. Finally, calculate the product of Ptotal x Vavg for each trial and record these values into Data;Table 1. NOTE: These values represent ?k? and should be relatively close together.;**need these questions answered also.;1. Find the average of each set of three volumes and record these averages in the data table.;2. Calculate the inverse 1/Vavg (mL-1) of each volume and record these values in data table.;Experiment Boyle?s Law;3. Using the graphing function of your spreadsheet prepare a graph of ?Pressure (Number of;Books) Vs Volume (mL)? with ?Pressure? on the y-axis and ?Volume? on the x?axis.;Experiment Boyle?s Law;4. Prepare a second graph showing pressure (number of books or weight) on the y-axis vs. 1/;Volume on the x axis. (Boyle?s Law states that gas Pressure x Volume = a constant (k), PV=k or;V=k/P. Therefore, volume varies inversely with pressure. Thus a graph of the gas pressure (Y;axis) to the inverse of the volume (X axis) should be a straight line with a slope of ?k?. Use the;trendline function of the graphing software to have Excel put the equation of the line directly on;the graph (y=mx+b). ?b? is the value where the line intersects the y-axis and roughly represents;the atmospheric pressure in whatever units were used on the pressure axis (books, etc);Experiment Boyle?s Law;NOTE: Remember that air pressure around us is 14.7 lbs/in2 (101kPa or 760 mmHg or 1,035 g/;cm2) at sea level (one atmospheric pressure) and the added mass to the plunger will increase;it further. The line obtained for the second plot crosses the y-axis of the graph above or below;the origin, which tells us that there is pressure on the gas even when there are no books on the;piston.;Depending on your instructor?s requirements the graphs can be plotted in book units or converted;to pressure units.;5. The local atmospheric pressure obtained through the above method must be added to all;pressure readings to obtain PT (Total Pressure);6. Finally, calculate the product of Ptotal x Vavg for each trial and record these values in the data;table. These values represent ?k? and should be relatively close together.

 

Paper#15609 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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