Details of this Paper

Prepare and explain an SFAS matrix and a TOWS matrix for your selected company

Description

solution


Question

Prepare and explain an SFAS matrix and a TOWS matrix for your selected company. Data presented in tables do not speak for themselves. Whenever you present the results of data analysis, you must interpret the data. What does it indicate? What does it mean? What are the implications? Please review Guidelines for the Strategic Audit Report/Preparing the tables: EFAS, IFAS, SFAS, and TOWS;Week 4 homework guidance.;Class, for this week?s individual assignment ensure you create your table (or if you don?t want to format in a table, just ensure you have all the information on your Word Document that should go in the table.) If you want to insert a table into your Word document, click on insert tab then click on table and select how many rows and columns. Ensure you answer the questions below and include in-text citations, reference page with properly formatted references, and ensure everything is in 3rd person and no opinions.;SFAS Questions that need to be addressed;A. Situational Analysis (include the SFAS matrix in the body of your report, not in an appendix);1. Of the external (EFAS) and internal (IFAS) factors listed, which are the strategic (most important) factors that strongly affect the company?s present and future performance?;2. Will this be an attractive industry in the future? What is happening in the external macro- environment and competitive environment to change the competitive dynamics of the industry?;3. Does the company?s current strategy fit with the external environment? Are the company?s activities and attributes appropriate for this environment?;Review of Mission Statement;1. Are the current vision and mission appropriate in light of the key strategic factors and problems?;2. What is the likely future of this company if it continues on its current path?;3. Should the mission statement be changed? If so, how?;4. If the mission statement is changed, what will be the most probable effects on the company?;TOWS Questions that need to be addressed;A. Strategic Alternatives (include the TOWS matrix in the body of your report, not in an appendix);1. Does the current strategy need to be changed or revised. Why? What evidence supports changing?;2. What are the major feasible alternative strategies available to the company? What are the pros and cons of each? Can scenarios be developed and agreed upon? (Alternatives must be compatible with societal environment, industry, and company for the next three to five years.);Consider stability, growth, and retrenchment as corporate strategies.;Consider cost leadership and differentiation as business strategies.;Consider any functional strategic alternatives that might be needed for reinforcement of an important corporate or business strategic alternative.;3. Assess those alternatives that will be most likely to move the company forward, and will help them attain a sustainable competitive advantage. Discuss each in detail, and use evidence to support why each will be effective.;needs to have graphs and questions answered needs;Attachment Preview;Guidelines_Strategic_Audit_Report_tables.pdf Download Attachment;Guidelines for the Strategic Audit Report;Adapted and revised from: Wheelen and Hunger, (2008). Concepts in Strategic;Management and Business Policy, 11th Ed., Pearson Education, Inc.;Purpose of the strategic audit assignment;Your assignment;Selecting a company for the strategic audit;An effective report;Required format for the strategic audit report;Required sections of the strategic audit report;Executive Summary;Current situation;Corporate governance;External environment: Opportunities and threats;Internal environment: Strengths and weaknesses;Analysis of strategic factors (SFAS);Strategic alternatives and recommended strategy (TOWS);Implementation of recommended strategy;Conclusions;Evaluating mission statements;Evaluating the Board of Directors;Preparing the tables: EFAS, IFAS, SFAS, and TOWS;Common-size statements;Analyzing financial statements;Analyzing financial ratios;Writing guidelines;Relaxed APA rules;Useful resources;Purpose of the strategic audit assignment;The point of this assignment is to see how well you can research, interpret, and draw;conclusions about the soundness and competitive position of a company. Opinions are not;worth any more than the evidence on which they are based. However, simply locating facts;is not sufficient, you also have to determine what those facts mean, and you have to report;everything in a convincing manner.;A strategic audit is usually done to help the firms management decide how to proceed, or;to support a potential investment or loan. The purpose of a strategic audit is essentially to;answer the question, What condition is this firm in? Because the audit is focused toward;answering this question, there must be a conclusion about what the audit shows.;Therefore, while this is mostly an objective, informative report, there is a persuasive twist;at the end.;1;The strategic audit is not an exam where you simply type in the right response. The;questions listed below serve as a basic guide for your efforts. These questions are a bare;minimum, and you need to answer all of them. However, these questions are not intended;to limit your research or limit what you report.;Think of the audit more like an investigative report. The reader wants to know something;significant about the company. Are they on the right track, or not? Is this a good operation;or not? Are they worth an investment or a loan?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;Your assignment is to;Select a public company to review.;Use the questions and instructions on pp. 4-10 to analyze the company.;Use the prescribed format on p. 3 to prepare a written report.;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;An effective report;This exercise is designed to make you think, not just about collecting company facts, but;also about how to communicate what those facts mean in an effective, informative;persuasive manner. Please remember, this is a senior-level course. We expect a lot as you;near the end of your studies.;The key to an effective report requires thinking about the purpose of the report.;Remember, the purpose of a strategic audit is essentially to answer the question, What;condition is this firm in? Therefore, everything in the audit should be directed toward;answering this question. To help decide, you might ask yourself how you would prepare;such a report if it were going to the CEO of your employer company instead of to your;course instructor.;What would top level executives be looking for? First of all, they want something that is;quick to read, easy to read, and easy to understand. They want something objective, that;sticks to the facts, and does not ramble on about unimportant points. They want something;that omits editorial comments or reflects editorial bias, at least until the conclusions at the;end. They want it written without grammar, punctuation, or spelling errors (in fact, they;tend to discard reports that contain such errors). They prefer an executive summary at the;beginning, which is often done in bullet-format. (NOTE: Although this is not APA style, it;does make good corporate sense, and bullets will be allowed in the executive summary.);RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;2;Required format for the strategic audit report;The strategic audit report is divided into nine prescribed format sections as shown below.;Your report must be formatted in the order shown. The main sections are highlighted in;yellow. There are several questions in each section (see pp. 4-10 for details) which must be;addressed in the report.;A few of the APA rules will be relaxed, as indicated in the writing guidelines section of this;document. However, proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling are still required, and;many of the APA rules will still apply, especially those concerning citations and references.;Papers without proper citations and references will not be accepted.;Everything must be in the main body of your report, including the EFAS, IFAS, SFAS, and;TOWS tables. Tables must be formatted to fit into the regular paper, which may require;some creativity and editing.;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;3;Required sections of the strategic audit report;I - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY;II - CURRENT SITUATION;Business model;Business lines;Business products;Customers;Value chain analysis;Diversification;Overall performance;Mission statement analysis;Questions and information for completing each section;appear on pp. 4-10. If you are completely unable to find;information on a particular question, indicate that in;your report.;The course assignments on Boards, EFAS, IFAS, SFAS;TOWS, Common-Size Statements, and Financial Ratio;Analysis will form portions of the completed audit.;III - CORPORATE GOVERNANCE;Directors;Management;IV - EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT: OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS;Societal environment;Task environment;EFAS analysis;V - INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT: STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES;Corporate structure;Competencies;Competitive advantages;Financial analysis;Common-size statements;Financial ratio analysis;IFAS analysis;VI - ANALYSIS OF STRATEGIC FACTORS (SWOT);SFAS analysis;Mission statement;VII - STRATEGIC ALTERNATIVES AND RECOMMENDED STRATEGY (TOWS);TOWS analysis;Recommended strategies;VIII - IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMENDED STRATEGY;Programs needed;Financial feasibility;Operating procedures needed;IX - CONCLUSIONS;RETURN TO TOP;4;CURRENT SITUATION;A. Briefly describe the companys business model. What is the companys basic approach to the;business, e.g. diversification, growth by acquisition, globalization, low cost or;differentiated niche? How does the company seek to add value to shareholders;customers, employees, and other stakeholders?;B. Does this company compete in a single line of business, or does it compete in multiple;businesses? If the latter, what is the relative significance of the various lines of business;(in revenues)?;C. What are the companys products? Who are the customers? What are the companys;sources of competitive advantage (if any) and are they sustainable?;D. Does the company compete domestically, in a few countries, or globally?;E. Illustrate and explain the key components of the companys value chain, including;domestic and international activities. In addition to the textbook, the following links;provide information about value chain analysis.;http://tutor2u.net/business/strategy/value_chain_analysis.htm;http://www.quickmba.com/strategy/value-chain/;F. Briefly describe strategic advantages and disadvantages identified by the value chain;analysis.;G. Explain the extent to which the company has vertically and horizontally diversified its;activities, and outsourced its operations.;1. What was the companys overall performance the past year (in terms of return on;investment, market share, and profitability)? How well have the companys overall;business strategies been working?;H. What is the companys current mission statement?;1. What is the stated strategic vision and mission? Are they appropriate? Do they;need to be revised or changed?;2. Analyze the mission statement, using Campbells 10 criteria for evaluating mission;statements.;3. Does the strategy or mix of strategies appear consistent with the vision and mission;and with the internal and external environments?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;CORPORATE GOVERNANCE;A. Board of Directors;1. Who are the board members? What are their backgrounds? Where do they work, and;what do they do? What qualifies them to be on the board?;5;Are they internal or external members? How long have they served on the board?;Do they own significant shares of stock? Are they paid in cash or stock options?;Does the company have an insider who controls a separate voting class of shares?;What do the board members contribute to the company in terms of knowledge;skills, background, and connections? If the company has international operations, do;board members have international experience?;6. What is their level of involvement in strategic management? Do they merely rubberstamp top management's proposals, or do they actively participate and suggest;future directions?;2.;3.;4.;5.;B. Top Management;1. How is the company organized and governed?;2. What person or group constitutes top management? Who is leading this company in;its drive to success?;3. How qualified are the managers running the company? What is their track record;like? Is management rewarded for performance, or for just showing up to work?;4. What role do stock options play in executive compensation? How much stake;(including options) do the CEO and top managers have in the company? Is it too;small to matter?;5. What are top management's chief characteristics in terms of knowledge, skills;background, and style? If the company has international operations, does top;management have international experience? Are executives from acquired companies;considered part of the top management team?;6. Has top management been responsible for the company's performance over the past;few years? How many managers have been in their current position for less than;three years? Were they promoted internally or externally hired?;7. Is top management sufficiently skilled to cope with likely future challenges?;8. What kind of incentive structure is in place? How clear are the goals set out by the;board's Compensation Committee for top management? Are they mostly short-term;or do they address long-term building of investor value?;9. How transparent are the company's disclosures? Is the company any better than its;competitors?;10. Does the company have a habit of showing one-time charges on their books?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT: OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS;A. Societal Environment;1. What general environmental forces are currently affecting both the company and the;industries in which it competes? Which ones present current or future threats, or;opportunities?;a. Economic;b. Technological;c. Political-legal;6;d. Socio-cultural;2. Are these forces different in various regions of the world?;B. Task Environment;1. What forces drive industry competition? Are these forces the same globally, or do they;vary from country to country? Rate each force as high, medium, or low.;a. Threat of new entrants;b. Bargaining power of buyers;c. Threat of substitute products or services;d. Bargaining power of suppliers;e. Rivalry among competing firms;f. Relative power of unions, governments, special interest groups, etc.;2. Identify the companys key competitors within the industry, and briefly describe each;companys competitive position (relative size, revenues, etc.) and likely future;moves. You may summarize this data in a table. In what ways is the company;stronger or weaker than key competitors, and what are the issues that management;must address?;3. What key factors in the immediate environment (i.e., customers, competitors;suppliers, creditors, labor unions, governments, trade associations, interest groups;local communities, and shareholders) are currently affecting the company most?;Which are current or future threats, or opportunities?;C. Summary of External Factors (include the EFAS table in the body of your report, not in an;appendix);1. Which of these forces are most important to the company and to the industries in;which it competes at the present time?;2. Which of these forces will be most important in the future?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT: STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES;A. Corporate Structure;1. How is the company structured at present?;a. Is the decision-making authority centralized around one group or decentralized;in many units?;b. Is the company organized on the basis of functions, projects, geography, or some;combination of these?;2. Is the present structure consistent with current strategies, as well as with the;company's international operations?;3. In what ways does this structure compare with those of similar companies?;B. Competencies and competitive advantage;1. What are the companys core competencies?;2. Are any of these distinctive competencies (better than the competition)?;7;3. What are the companys competitive advantages? Do they appear to be sustainable;given changing conditions?;4. How are competitors reacting to the changing environment? Will they enjoy a;relative advantage that may have an impact on this companys ability to succeed?;C. Finance (include the common-size statements and financial ratios in the body of your;report, not in an appendix);1. Analyze the companys financial statements for the last three to five (3-5) years, and;compare them to key competitors and industry averages. Explain how this;information relates to current and future strategic initiatives;a. Prepare comparative common-size statements for 3-5 years, including balance;sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements.;b. Are there any significant differences when statements are calculated as commonsize versus reported dollars?;c. Analyze the financial statements, including financial ratio analysis.;d. What trends emerge from the financial analysis?;e. What impact have these trends had on past performance and how might these;trends affect future performance?;2. How well is the company performing financially? Is the companys financial;situation improving or deteriorating?;3. How well does this financial analysis support the companys current strategy?;D. Summary of Internal Factors (include the IFAS table in the body of your report, not in an;appendix);1. Which of these factors are core competencies?;2. Which, if any, are distinctive competencies?;3. Which of these factors are the most important to the company and to the industries in;which it competes at the present time?;4. Which of these factors might be most important in the future?;5. Which functions or activities are candidates for outsourcing?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;ANALYSIS OF STRATEGIC FACTORS (SWOT);A. Situational Analysis (include the SFAS matrix in the body of your report, not in an;appendix);1. Of the external (EFAS) and internal (IFAS) factors listed, which are the strategic (most;important) factors that strongly affect the companys present and future;performance?;2. Will this be an attractive industry in the future? What is happening in the external;macro- environment and competitive environment to change the competitive;dynamics of the industry?;3. Does the companys current strategy fit with the external environment? Are the;companys activities and attributes appropriate for this environment?;8;B. Review of Mission Statement;1. Are the current vision and mission appropriate in light of the key strategic factors and;problems?;2. What is the likely future of this company if it continues on its current path?;3. Should the mission statement be changed? If so, how?;4. If the mission statement is changed, what will be the most probable effects on the;company?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;STRATEGIC ALTERNATIVES AND RECOMMENDED STRATEGY;A. Strategic Alternatives (include the TOWS matrix in the body of your report, not in an;appendix);1. Does the current strategy need to be changed or revised. Why? What evidence;supports changing?;2. What are the major feasible alternative strategies available to the company? What;are the pros and cons of each? Can scenarios be developed and agreed upon?;(Alternatives must be compatible with societal environment, industry, and company;for the next three to five years.);a. Consider stability, growth, and retrenchment as corporate strategies.;b. Consider cost leadership and differentiation as business strategies.;c. Consider any functional strategic alternatives that might be needed for;reinforcement of an important corporate or business strategic alternative.;3. Assess those alternatives that will be most likely to move the company forward, and;will help them attain a sustainable competitive advantage. Discuss each in detail;and use evidence to support why each will be effective.;B. Recommended Strategy;1. Specify which of the strategic alternatives recommended for the corporate, business;and functional levels of the company. Are different business or functional strategies;recommended for different units of the company?;NOTE: Be specific. General statements such as The company should expand;internationally are not sufficient. Instead, you might state, The company should;offshore the manufacturing operations to Poland, the Czech Republic, or elsewhere;in Central Europe.;2. Support each recommendation by explaining why it is recommended, how it;exploits the key strengths and opportunities and minimizes the weaknesses and;threats, how it will help the company attain a competitive advantage, and why it is;superior to the other alternatives.;3. Justify recommendations in terms of their ability to resolve both long-term and;short-term problems and effectively deal with strategic factors.;4. What policies should be developed or revised to guide effective implementation?;5. What is the impact of the recommendations on the company's core and distinctive;competencies?;9;6. Project the impact of the recommendations on the future economics of the company;and the industry. How will the changes improve the companys ability to add value;to the shareholders, customers, employees, and other stakeholders?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;IMPLEMENTATION OF RECOMMENDED STRATEGY;A. What kinds of programs (for example, restructuring the corporation or;instituting TQM) should be developed to implement the recommended strategy?;B. Are the programs financially feasible?;C. What new standard operating procedures will need to be developed?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;CONCLUSIONS;The purpose of a strategic audit is essentially to answer the question, What shape is this;firm in? In essence, the final audit report should answer that question. Most of the report;will be taken up with what you found, and what it means to the company. That is the;objective, informative part.;The persuasive twist comes in the conclusion, where you want to persuade the companys;management to take a particular action (continue, or change direction). The senior;managers of any company will usually be reluctant to change their current strategies;(which they put in place) unless you can convince them that change is necessary for the;company to survive or thrive.;You should clearly state your conclusions and recommendations. You should also provide;supporting evidence from your research. Supporting evidence would include key industry;and company issues, trends, threats and opportunities, and why and how your;recommendations will help the company survive and prosper, create value, and attain a;sustainable competitive advantage in the marketplace. In short, the conclusion should be a;strong statement, perhaps even a call for action.;You should also explain how the company should go about implementing your;recommendations, and what the financial benefits will be (including the impact on assets;and liabilities, revenues and costs, and profits and cash flow).;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY;An executive summary is usually 1-3 pages of bullet statements highlighting the main;points of the report. This part cannot be written until after you have finished your report;10;but it is placed at the beginning of the report, right after the title page. It should contain the;main highlights of the report, and it should offer a succinct, compelling argument for your;position!;The executive summary may be the only section of the report that top managers will read.;Therefore, it should be a brief, persuasive document that compels action.;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;11;Selecting a company for the strategic audit;First, it is always best to select a company you are interested in. This report is difficult and;time-consuming. It is even worse if you are not interested in the company.;When deciding on a company to analyze, be sure that there is sufficient information;available. This must include 3-5 years of financial statements (balance sheet, income;statement, cash flow statement). Generally, you will do much better to select a public;company, since they are required to make this kind of information publically available.;If you pick a company with a relatively narrow focus, it is easier to determine what;business they are in, and who their competitors are. Large, complex companies (i.e.;General Motors or General electric) make this assignment more difficult. However, if you;try to select only one division, you will most likely find that the information you need is not;available. Major companies rarely publish data on specific subsidiaries, such data is;combined in the parent company information.;You may be able to use your employer's company. However, if your employer is a private;company the biggest problem is getting access to the financial statements. Another big;problem for some students is remaining objective about their employer. The strategic;audit is largely an objective exercise, and there is no place for editorial bias and PR hype.;Interim assignments during the course will draw on different parts of the audit. In other;words, you will be doing the total audit in pieces, rather than waiting to do everything at;the end of the course. This is intended to make the entire process easier.;RETURN TO TOP;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;12;Evaluating mission statements;Source: Strategic Highlight 1.1, p. 13, from: Wheelen, Thomas L. and J. David Hunger (2008) Concepts in Strategic;Management & Business Policy, 11 ed. Pearson Prentice Hall. Reprinted from Long Range Planning, Vol. 30, No. 6;1997, Campbell, "Mission Statements," pp. 931-932. Copyright 1997 with permission of Elsevier.;Andrew Campbell, a director of the Ashridge Strategic Management Centre and a longtime contributor to Long Range Planning, proposes a means for evaluating a mission;statement. Arguing that mission statements can be more than just an expression of a;company's purpose and ambition, he suggests that they can also be a company flag to rally;around, a signpost for all stakeholders, a guide to behavior, and a celebration of a;company's culture. For a company trying to achieve all of the above, evaluate its mission;statement using the following 10-question test.;Score each question: 0 for no, 1 for somewhat, or 2 for yes. According to Campbell, a score;of over 15 is exceptional, and a score of less than 10 suggests that more work needs to be;done.;1. Does the statement describe an inspiring purpose that avoids playing to the selfish;interests of the stakeholders?;2. Does the statement describe the company's responsibility to its stakeholders?;3. Does the statement define a business domain and explain why it is attractive?;4. Does the statement describe the strategic positioning that the company prefers in a;way that helps to identify the sort of competitive advantage it will look for?;5. Does the statement identify values that link with the companys purpose and act as;beliefs with which employees can feel proud?;6. Do the values resonate with and reinforce the company's strategy?;7. Does the statement describe important behavior standards that serve as beacons of the;strategy and the values?;8. Are the behavior standards described in a way that enables individual employees to;judge whether they are behaving correctly?;9. Does the statement give a portrait of the company, capturing the culture of the company?;10. Is the statement easy to read?;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;13;Evaluating the Board of Directors;In the past, the Boards major responsibility was hiring the CEO. It was largely through;their selection of a CEO that they influenced the direction of the company. The CEO and his;team did most of the strategic planning, and the Board usually accepted it, many being little;more than rubber-stamps for executive decisions. However, things change and evolve, and;the role of the Board is now under scrutiny. Boards are being publicly indicted for;complicity in a host of corporate fiascos.;The key to this exercise is to explain who the directors are and what they have to offer. If;they were all well-known, famous names, we could understand who they are simply from;their names. But how are we to know who they are if their names are not well-known? In;other words, the names mean nothing unless we know what the names represent. Sam;Smith means nothing. Sam Smith, CEO of IBM, means much.;This should not be a long, lengthy section, but a very concise one. It should not simply be a;copy-and-paste from the companys literature. Photographs do not necessarily add;anything. Think about how you can best present the information in a clear, concise;readable fashion.;You can save a lot of time and writing by placing data on directors in a table, such as;Name;Shares;Date Joined BoD;Background Comments;Job Title;Committees;Primary employer;Most people are in awe of credentials. Credentials have replaced competency as the;criterion for selection. This is not to denigrate credentials, but not to revere them simply;for their own sake. The credentials of the board members and top managers at failed firms;are as impressive as those at successful firms (think Enron). Unfortunately, there is no;credential for honesty, integrity, service, wisdom, common sense, judgment, commitment;and conscientiousness.;If all the boards and management teams were as great as the company literature claims;then why do we continue to have so many corporate problems? A key in evaluating board;members and top managers is to try seeing beyond the hype promulgated by the company;PR team, and understand what is actually happening. Admittedly, this is difficult, often;impossible without inside information.;Do some thinking on your own, and come to some kind of reasoned conclusion. Oldfashioned common sense goes a long way. Learn to read between the lines, and beyond the;apparent. Ask yourself questions: Does this make sense? How do I know this? Healthy;skepticism is the order of the day.;RETURN TO CORPORATE GOVERNANCE;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;14;Preparing the tables: EFAS, IFAS, SFAS, and TOWS;Data is often presented in tables, and sometimes students assume that the tables of data;will speak for themselves. They do not, data needs to be interpreted. It is a major mistake;to assume that the reader will perceive the same thing you do in the data. Whenever you;present the results of data analysis, you must interpret the data. What does it indicate?;What does it mean? What are the implications?;When you prepare the EFAS, IFAS, SFAS, and TOWS tables, you need to add explanations.;Whenever you prepare any table you also need commentary explaining the meaning;behind the numbers. Explaining how the score is derived can be a good start, but that is;not sufficient. What does the score indicate about the companys position in the industry?;What does it indicate relative to the companys strategy? Is this a good, bad, or indifferent;score? Why?;The reason for emphasizing the explanation is that people who read your reports are never;as immersed in the data as you are, nor should you expect them to be. They have not;studied the issues in depth as much as you have. Your reports (with tables, figures, and;illustrations) should explain things so less-informed readers will know what it all means;and enable them can make informed decisions.;There are three keys to using and understanding the EFAS and IFAS tables. First, there is;the issue of identifying the most relevant factors. Second, there is the issue of how to;assign accurate weightings. Both of these call for subjective judgment. However, once;determined, the third key issue is to objectively use the data generated, regardless of how;you feel about the company emotionally. Or, as one of my mentors used to say, Call it like;it is, not what you would like it to be.;Most of you are probably familiar with the classic SWOT analysis matrix. The SFAS and;TOWS tables are simply a more focused extension of the classic matrix. These tables must;also be explained. Why did you focus in on specific items? What does the table indicate;relative to the firms strategy? Why?;RETURN TO EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT;RETURN TO INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT;RETURN TO ANALYSIS OF STRATEGIC FACTORS;RETURN TO STRATEGIC ALTERNATIVES;RETURN TO REQUIRED SECTIONS OF REPORT;RETURN TO TOP;15;Common-size statements;A common-size statemen

 

Paper#16488 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

Price : $57
SiteLock