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Two-Way ANOVA

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PSYC 355;SPSS HOMEWORK 4 INSTRUCTIONS;Two-Way ANOVA;Part One;Note: For the two-way ANOVA, you will be expected to create a line graph as covered in;the SPSS tutorial in the Course Content (and not a boxplot as in the textbook). This applies;to future cumulative questions as well.;Green & Salkind: Lesson 26, Exercises 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8;The following helpful tips are numbered to correspond with the exercise number to which they;refer (a dash indicates that no tips are needed);1.;Instead of identifying these values on your output, as the text states, please write;them into your Word file as written answers for #1 a, b, c, and d. (2 pts for output, a-d = 2;pts each);a. 3x3 Anova was conducted to investigate the effects of reinformecment schedules;and arithmetic problem solving performance of second grade students the F value of;the main effect was shown as 25.034 the total GPA mean was b..196 with the c. effect;size of ________ and d. the p value for the reinforce type main effect is.000;Tests of Between-Subjects Effects;Dependent Variable: Scores on an arithmetic problem-solving test;Type III Sum of;Source;Squares;Partial Eta;df;Mean Square;F;Sig.;Squared;Corrected Model;1927.455a;5;385.491;19.662;.000;.621;Intercept;56204.182;1;56204.182;2866.674;.000;.979;schedule;490.909;1;490.909;25.039;.000;.294;1249.182;2;624.591;31.857;.000;.515;187.364;2;93.682;4.778;.012;.137;Error;1176.364;60;19.606;Total;59308.000;66;3103.818;65;reinfor;schedule * reinfor;Corrected Total;a. R Squared =.621 (Adjusted R Squared =.589);4.;Produce a line graph instead of a boxplot for this problem. Follow directions in;course SPSS tutorial for setting up a line graph. (2 pts);Page 1 of 10;PSYC 355;Page 2 of 10;PSYC 355;5. Conduct a two way ANOVA to evaluat difference among the groups, according to;gender and disability status of the child, in the amount of time fathers spent playing;with their children (2 pts);Between-Subjects Factors;Value Label;Disability status of the child;1;N;Typically;20;Developing;2;Physical;20;Disability;3;Mental;20;Retardation;Gender of Child;1;Male;29;2;Female;31;Descriptive Statistics;Dependent Variable: play;Disability status of the child;Gender of Child;Typically Developing;Male;7.30;1.829;10;Female;6.80;2.201;10;Total;7.05;1.986;20;Male;3.00;1.563;10;Female;3.40;1.897;10;Total;3.20;1.704;20;Male;3.22;1.716;9;Female;4.00;1.612;11;Total;3.65;1.663;20;Male;4.55;2.613;29;Female;4.71;2.369;31;Total;4.63;2.470;60;Physical Disability;Mental Retardation;Total;Mean;Std. Deviation;N;Levene's Test of Equality of Error Variancesa;Dependent Variable: play;Page 3 of 10;PSYC 355;F;df1;.427;df2;Sig.;5;54;.828;Tests the null hypothesis that the error variance of;the dependent variable is equal across groups.;a. Design: Intercept + disable + gender + disable *;gender;Tests of Between-Subjects Effects;Dependent Variable: play;Type III Sum of;Source;Partial Eta;Squares;df;Mean Square;F;Sig.;Squared;Corrected Model;182.278a;5;36.456;11.081;.000;.506;Intercept;1276.571;1;1276.571;388.025;.000;.878;disable;178.579;2;89.289;27.140;.000;.501;gender;.763;1;.763;.232;.632;.004;4.294;2;2.147;.653;.525;.024;Error;177.656;54;3.290;Total;1648.000;60;359.933;59;disable * gender;Corrected Total;a. R Squared =.506 (Adjusted R Squared =.461);Estimates;Dependent Variable: play;95% Confidence Interval;Disability status of the child;Mean;Std. Error;Lower Bound;Upper Bound;Typically Developing;7.050;.406;6.237;7.863;Physical Disability;3.200;.406;2.387;4.013;Mental Retardation;3.611;.408;2.794;4.428;Page 4 of 10;PSYC 355;Pairwise Comparisons;Dependent Variable: play;95% Confidence Interval for;(I) Disability status of the;(J) Disability status of the;child;child;Differenceb;Mean;Difference (I-J) Std. Error;Sig.b;Lower Bound;Upper Bound;Physical Disability;Physical Disability;3.850;.574;.000;2.700;5.000;Mental Retardation;Typically Developing;*;3.439*;.575;.000;2.286;4.592;*;.574;.000;-5.000;-2.700;-.411;.575;.478;-1.564;.742;*;-3.439;.575;.000;-4.592;-2.286;.411;.575;.478;-.742;1.564;Typically Developing;-3.850;Mental Retardation;Mental Retardation;Typically Developing;Physical Disability;Based on estimated marginal means;*. The mean difference is significant at the.05 level.;b. Adjustment for multiple comparisons: Least Significant Difference (equivalent to no adjustments).;6.;I would use a three way comparison I would say by looking at the graph and data;the data shows some significance and in order to maintain the intergrity of the study and;data a three way comparison would be used.(2 pts);7.;All homework Results sections should follow the example given in the Course;Content document Writing Results of Statistical Tests in APA Format (note: you do not;have to refer to a figure). (2 pts);Tests of Between-Subjects Effects;Dependent Variable: play;Type III Sum of;Source;Squares;Partial Eta;df;Mean Square;F;Sig.;Squared;Corrected Model;182.278a;5;36.456;11.081;.000;.506;Intercept;1276.571;1;1276.571;388.025;.000;.878;disable;178.579;2;89.289;27.140;.000;.501;gender;.763;1;.763;.232;.632;.004;4.294;2;2.147;.653;.525;.024;Error;177.656;54;3.290;Total;1648.000;60;359.933;59;disable * gender;Corrected Total;a. R Squared =.506 (Adjusted R Squared =.461);Page 5 of 10;PSYC 355;A 3x3 Anova was conducted to determine the effects of three disability conditions;(mental retardation, typical development, and physical disability) and two genders.;F (1,54) = 27.140, p <.001 =;=.50;8.;Produce a line graph instead of a boxplot for this problem. Follow directions in;course SPSS tutorial for setting up a line graph. (2 pts);Part Two;1.;A health psychologist is interested in the effects of exercise on stress in people;who regularly exercise. Specifically, she is interested in the type of exercise as well as the;time of day that the individual exercises. She recruits participants from a local health club;who regularly participate in one of three types of exercise: swimming, aerobics, and;tennis. She further divides these participants by whether they exercise in the morning or;Page 6 of 10;PSYC 355;the evening. She then administers a questionnaire to each individual assessing their selfreported stress level. (HIGHER SCORE = HIGHER STRESS). Conduct a two-way;ANOVA to analyze these data. Use Tukeys test in order to conduct any necessary;post hoc analyses if there are significant main effects. You do not have to follow up;on significant interactions at this time.;The steps will be the same as the ones you have been practicing in Part One of the;assignmentthe only difference is that you are now responsible for creating the data file;as well. Remember to name and define your variables under the Variable View, then;return to the Data View to enter the data. (2 pts for output, - 1 pt if no post hoc);Page 7 of 10;PSYC 355;Swimming;Morning;Evening;Aerobics;Tennis;10;16;12;16;9;14;13;8;12;12;19;21;16;18;17;21;18;14;17;12;14;9;10;12;15;19;14;2. Write an APA-style results section describing the outcome. All homework Results;sections should follow the example given in the Course Content document Writing;Results of Statistical Tests in APA Format (note: you do not have to refer to a;figure). For the two-way ANOVA, be sure to include statistical statements concerning;the F ratios and p values for both main effects and the interaction, and interpretation;statements about all 3 of these effects. (2 pts);3. Is there a significant interaction effect? (2 pts);4. Based on your results, is there one type of exercise that seems more effective in;reducing stress than the others? Remember that higher scores = higher stress. (2 pts);This assignment is due by 11:59 p.m. (ET) on Monday of Module/Week 4.;Part Three: Cumulative Homework;1. An investigator in child development research is studying the development of object;permanence the understanding that an object still exists even if its out of sight. She;tests three groups of infants ten who are 9 months old, 8 who are 12 months old;and 10 who are 15 months old. She presents each of the infants with 10 trials. On;each trial, a toy is first shown to the child and then covered with a piece of cloth. The;infant demonstrates object permanence if he or she looks for the object when its;covered. Each infant is given a score for the number of trials (out of 10) on which he;or she shows object permanence. Is there a significant difference between the groups;on demonstrations of object permanence? Choose the correct test to analyze this;question, set up the SPSS file, and run the analysis. Follow the directions under the;table below.;Page 8 of 10;PSYC 355;9 Months;8, 3, 4, 6, 5, 4, 9, 2, 0, 1;12 Months;10, 5, 6, 7, 6, 5, 10, 3;15 Months;10, 8, 9, 9, 8, 7, 9, 6, 6, 8;a) Paste appropriate SPSS output. (2 pts);b) Paste appropriate SPSS graph. (2 pts);c) Write an APA-style results section describing the outcome. All;homework Results sections should follow the example given in;the Course Content document Writing Results of Statistical Tests;in APA Format (note: you do not have to refer to a figure). (2 pts);2. A researcher wanted to investigate whether there was a difference in satisfaction;ratings in an assisted living facility between residents who had a pet with them vs.;those who did not have a pet. She administered a scale asking them to rate their;overall satisfaction with the facility. Did having a pet have an impact on the;residents overall satisfaction levels? Choose the correct test to analyze this question;set up the SPSS file, and run the analysis. Follow the directions under the table below;(on next page).;Pet;No Pet;47;42;35;46;49;39;40;46;52;40;30;25;24;42;28;25;Page 9 of 10;PSYC 355;a) Paste appropriate SPSS output. (2 pts);b) Paste appropriate SPSS graph. (2 pts);c) Write an APA-style results section describing the outcome. All;homework Results sections should follow the example given in;the Course Content document Writing Results of Statistical Tests;in APA Format (note: you do not have to refer to a figure). (2 pts)

 

Paper#16730 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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