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Practicum Observations/Teaching Lessons

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Question;Practicum Observations/Teaching Lessonsi) In Modules 2-6, devote attention to each of the four areas of literacy development. For each of these categories, observe a classroom (grades 1-3) as the teacher and students focus on one of the four areas. Keep notes on activities used by the teacher. Suggested practicum schedule for observations and teaching the lesson plans:(1) Module 2: Observations only, look for differentiation techniques for ELL?s and special needs students.(2) Module 3: Phonemic Awareness and Phonics(3) Module 4: Word Study and Fluency(4) Module 5: Vocabulary Development(5) Module 6: Comprehensionii) Lesson Plans and Teaching Lessons(1) In each of the four areas and using literacy assessments available in the classroom, administer a pre-test to one student in your practicum classroom.(2) After you have administered the pre-test, confer with the mentor teacher and prepare lesson plans to address the four areas of literacy development. These lessons should be based on the direct instruction model. The lessons should reflect the areas of need identified through the data analysis collected from the pre-test.(3) Teach the lessons to the one student you assessed previously.(1) Administer assessments as a post-test to the same student. Analyze the data to see if learning has improved from the pre-test to the post-test.Assessment: Student Prompts/Teacher DirectionsIndividual: Practicum Teacher Work Sample (Benchmark Assessment)a) Reflection Paper(1) Write a 1000-1250 word essay summarizing:(a) Your learning experience during the practicum(b) Assessment administration- the pre and post assessment data, challenges and strengths.(c) Data analysis. Include a chart or graphic organizer.(d) Specific activities with the student during instruction(e) Progress made to be notated in the chart(f) Collaboration with the classroom teacher(g) Your reflection on how assessment guides instruction. Explain how data was used to target the needs of the student and to plan instruction.(2) Use standard essay format in APA style, including an introduction, conclusion, and title page. An abstract is not required. Cite in-text and in the References section.b) Submission of Benchmark Assessmenti) Combine all of your assessment data, copies of your lesson plans for each of the literacy areas, and reflection paper under one APA-style title page.ii) Complete and include the applicable Practicum Placement and the Observation Log forms located in the practicum manual.iii) Obtain the completed Classroom Teacher Evaluation Feedback Forms from practicum classroom teacher and include them with the submission of the Benchmark Assessment.iv) Submit this assignment to the instructor in ANGEL by the end of Module 8.v) Additionally, submit the assignment in TaskStream. Directions for submitting to TaskStream can be found on the College of Education?s page in the Student Success Center.Scoring Tool/Guide (Rubric)Practicum Teacher Work Sample (Benchmark Assessment)Levels/Criteria1: Unsatisfactory2: Less than Satisfactory3: Satisfactory4: Good5: ExcellentScore/Level0%65%75%85%100%Applying ACEI Standards 15% 1.0 Development, Learning, and Motivation (1.875%)Candidates do not know, understand, or use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students? development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.Candidates know and understand some of the concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students? development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation but rarely use them effectively.Candidates know, understand, and effectively use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students? development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.Candidates know, understand, and carefully use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students? development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.Candidates know, understand, and methodically use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to development of children and young adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support individual students? development, acquisition of knowledge, and motivation.2.1 Reading, Writing, and Oral Language (1.88%)Candidates do not demonstrate competence in use of English language arts, nor do they know, understand, or use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.Candidates demonstrate a limited level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use few concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.Candidates demonstrate an adequate level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.Candidates demonstrate a high level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.Candidates demonstrate a comprehensive level of competence in use of English language arts and they know, understand, and use concepts from reading, language and child development, to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills and to help students successfully apply their developing skills to many different situations, materials, and ideas.3.1 Integrating and Applying Knowledge for Instruction(1.875%)Candidates do not plan or implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, or community.Candidates rarely plan or implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.Candidates plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.Candidates skillfully plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.Candidates methodically plan and implement instruction based on knowledge of students, learning theory, connections across the curriculum, curricular goals, and community.3.2 Adaptation to Diverse Students (1.875%)Candidates do not understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, nor do they create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.Candidates do not completely understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and rarely create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and skillfully create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.Candidates understand how elementary students differ in their development and approaches to learning, and methodically create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.3.3 Development of Critical Thinking and Problem Solving(1.875%)Candidates do not understand or use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students? development of critical thinking or problem solving.Candidates understand but rarely use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students? development of critical thinking and problem solving.Candidates understand and use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students? development of critical thinking and problem solving.Candidates understand and efficiently use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students? development of critical thinking and problem solving.Candidates understand and meticulously use a variety of teaching strategies that encourage elementary students? development of critical thinking and problem solving.4.0 Assessment for Instruction (1.88%)Candidates do not know, understand, or use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate or strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.Candidates know, understand, but rarely use some formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.Candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.Candidates know, understand, and effectively use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.Candidates know, understand, and strategically use formal and informal assessments strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of elementary student.5.1 Professional Growth, Reflection, and Evaluation(1.88%)Candidates are not aware of and do not reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning, they do not evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community or actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.Candidates are rarely aware of and scarcely reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning, they seldom evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and do not seek out opportunities to grow professionally.Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning, they occasionally evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and seek out opportunities to grow professionally.Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning, they typically evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and seek out opportunities to grow professionally.Candidates are aware of and reflect on their practice in light of research on teaching, professional ethics, and resources available for professional learning, they continually evaluate the effects of their professional decisions and actions on students, families and other professionals in the learning community and actively seek out opportunities to grow professionally.5.2 Collaboration with Families, Colleagues, and Community Agencies (1.88%)Candidates do not know the importance of establishing or maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.Candidates know very little about the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and do not know how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community but know very little about how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and effectively know how to use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.Candidates know the importance of establishing and maintaining a positive collaborative relationship with families, school colleagues, and agencies in the larger community and know how to comprehensively use that knowledge to promote the intellectual, social, emotional, physical growth and well-being of children.Content: Lesson Plans: (70%) Vocabulary: (14%)The vocabulary lesson plan is missing many of the required components. Attention to prior knowledge and essential vocabulary is weak or missing..The vocabulary lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to prior knowledge and essential vocabulary is minimal or underdeveloped.The vocabulary lesson plan consists of all the required components. The lesson activates prior knowledge and teaches essential vocabulary that enhances comprehension.All lesson plan components are addressed. Prior knowledge is surveyed and built to support new learning. Essential vocabulary is thoughtfully developed and meaningfully connected to prior knowledge.All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create depth of understanding through connecting old knowledge with new knowledge and predictions.Phonemic Awareness and Phonics: (14%)The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan is missing many of the required components. Attention to phonemic awareness and phonics is weak, missing, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate..The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to phonemic awareness and phonics is minimal or underdeveloped. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.The phonemic awareness and phonics lesson plan consists of all the required components. The phonemic awareness and phonics activities are grade appropriate and teach students to actively analyze word parts in an effort to generalize to new word..All lesson plan components are addressed. The phonemic awareness and phonics skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and meaningfully connected to grade appropriate academic standards.All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create multiple and meaningful opportunities to learn word parts that aid in segmenting and blending phonemes and letters. There is a strategic balance between word sounds and word letters.Word Study and Fluency: (14%)The word study/ fluency lesson plan is missing many of the required components. The word study/fluency activities are missing, weak, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate..The word study/ fluency lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to word study/fluency is minimal, underdeveloped, or inappropriate for teaching word study/ fluency. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.The word study/ fluency lesson plan consists of all the required components. The word study activities develop ways to build fluency (speed and accuracy) with text. Activities are appropriate for grade level and encourage participation.All lesson plan components are addressed. The fluency skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and provide meaningful practice with familiar text. The fluency activities are fun, interactive, and creative.All lesson plan components are addressed. The word study skills and activities are thoughtfully developed and provide meaningful fluency practice with familiar text. The word study/ fluency activities are fun, interactive, and creative.All lesson components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities create multiple and meaningful opportunities to practice word study skills while reading whole text with smoothness, accuracy, speed, and prosody. Activities are engaging and focus on fluent decoding/ processing of whole text.Comprehension: (14%)The reading comprehension lesson plan is missing many the required components. Attention to reading comprehension is weak, missing, or incomplete. Skills and activities are not grade appropriate.The reading comprehension lesson plan consists of most of the required components. Attention to reading comprehension is minimal or underdeveloped. Minimal or no attention is given to quality ?before, during, and after? reading activities to develop comprehension. Skills and activities are mostly grade appropriate.The reading comprehension lesson plan consists of all the required components. The reading comprehension activities address ?before, during, and after? reading stages. The learning activities are high quality and strategically selected.All lesson plan components are addressed. The reading comprehension activities are thoughtfully developed and focus on building understanding of text and extending learning beyond the text.All lesson plan components are addressed. Exceptionally organized activities that create multiple and meaningful opportunities to create and extend learning of the text. There is a variety of useful strategies in activity selection. The specific comprehension strategies teach student independence.Assessment Instruments: (14%)Assessment instruments are inappropriate and/or do not focus on the required areas. Data is weakly analyzed. The selected learning experiences are at the wrong level or are inappropriate.Most of the assessment instruments are skill appropriate and focus on the required areas. Data is minimally or incorrectly analyzed. Most of the learning experiences are at the right level.Assessment instruments are skill appropriate and focus on the required areas. Data is thoughtfully analyzed to select appropriate learning experiences at the right level.Multiple assessment instruments are used for each skill area. Triangulation of data is used to support the analysis/ conclusions. Data analysis strongly supports the selection of lesson choices.Graphs and tables are used to represent the data. Strong justifications are provided to explicate the direct connections between activity selections and the student assessment data. Assessment results clearly indicate student achievement level.Reflection Paper Content: (10%)The reflection portion is superficial and/or lacks quality attention to areas for self-improvement. Weak or no connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Suggestions are unrealistic and impractical.The reflection portion identifies several areas for self-improvement, but with minimal depth. Some connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Most suggestions are realistic and practical.The reflection portion has depth and identifies areas for self-improvement. Connections are made between the assignment and the text readings. Suggestions are realistic and practical.There is a thorough reflection that involves input from the classroom teacher and demonstrates self-reflection that is directly supported with examples. Suggestions for improvements incorporate clear steps that are logically based on the examples provided in paper.The reflection is exceptionally organized and strongly supported by many concrete examples from the data and lesson events. The candidate demonstrates a solid self-reflection that incorporates classroom teacher?s comments and that offers superb suggestions for improvement.Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar): (2.5%)Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning.Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader.Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but are not overly distracting to the reader.Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present.Writer is clearly in control of standard, written American English.APA Format and Style Requirements: (2.5%)APA format and style are not evident.Title page is present, though missing APA elements, in-text citations, where necessary, are used but formatted inaccurately and not referenced.All key elements of an APA title page are present, in-text citations and a reference section are present with few format errors. Mechanics of writing are reflective of APA style.Plan elements are theoretically supported with accurate citations and references.A broad understanding of APA format and style is evident in use of level headings and lists, for example.? 2010

 

Paper#36114 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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