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Can an employee be simultaneously committed to both employer and union goals....

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Question;Can an employee be simultaneously committed to both employer and union goals? Please provide your perspective with supported references. Thanks.Instructions: Your initial post should be at least 250 words. Please respond to at least 2 other students. Responses should be a minimum of 100 words and include direct questions.I need a 250 word initial post with two sources + 2 100 word response to the posts below.1st Student that needs a 100 word response:Nichole:I do believe that an employee can be committed to both their employer and also union goals simultaneously. Dual commitment, which is commonly known as an employee having commitment to both their employer and union, appears to be related to and connected to two things: (1) a labor relations climate that is positive, and (2) individual differences (Fossum, 2009). It appears that a higher commitment to both a union and an employer are directly related to involvement in union activities (Fossum, 2009). Additionally, a higher commitment to both an employer and a union is reported by employees when they perceive that they have a larger influence on their job and in an environment where a cooperative and active labor-management program exists (Fossum, 2009). It makes sense that a higher commitment to an employer by those employees that are actively involved in local unions should almost be expected, as it is a reciprocal relationship. The activities within the local union are dependent upon the continued local membership, which is dependent upon a continuation of employment with the employer (Fossum, 2009). A positive work environment is also important, as within such an environment, workers will be committed to both their employer and their union (Cohen, 2003). Those employees who are dually committed appear more likely to be accepting of, and supportive of, problem solving approaches and solutions to collective bargaining (Cohen, 2003). Although many may fear a negative relation, it has been shown that dual commitment and a positive relationship between both a union and an employer, as well as the addition of positive management practices, will not undermine or deter an employee?s commitment to a union (Cohen, 2003).ReferencesCohen, A. (2003). Multiple commitments in the workplace an integrative approach. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlhaum Associates.Fossum, J. (2009). Labor relations: Development, structure, process (10th ed.). Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin.Second Student that needs 100 word response:For employees to hold both commitment to their unions and employer is better known as dual commitment. Dual commitment is considered when the employee feels that they are divided between there organization they are employer and there unions. The dual can be handled by both individual differences and can have a positive labor relations climate. Employee involvement into union activities can be higher committed to both unions and the employer. Also it can be high where employee believe that have a greater job influence and also if they have an active and a cooperative labor-management program is operating (Fossum, 2010).Based off the reading and some research I think employees can be committed to both there union goals and there employer. As long as everyone knows the position and labor management can be set and each have goals can be met. Being raised up with my father who was part of a union and was dedicated to his employer, each goals and each employee was well taken care of. My father was part of the CWA, Communication Workers of America while employee with Bellsouth now AT&T. In this day and time many unions are as large as they were in the past, but if unions were present today there would be many issues that have occurred would have been handled. Dual commitment for me sounds like this commitment can help out many employees in this day and time and set goals and make sure all issues are dealt with in accordance.

 

Paper#51938 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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