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Exam: 986008RR - Interpreting What You Read

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Question;Exam: 986008RR - Interpreting What You Read;When you have completed your exam and reviewed your answers;click Submit Exam. Answers will not be recorded until you;hit Submit Exam. If you need to exit before completing the;exam, click Cancel Exam.;Questions 1 to 20: Select the best answer to each question.;Note that a question and its answers may be split across a page;break, so be sure that you have seen the entire question and;all the answers before choosing an answer.;1. Which one of the following statements contains a simile?;A. The soaring bird quickly disappeared from our sight.;B. I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.;C. The maple wears a gayer scarf.;D. The woods went up in flame.;2. Below is the last stanza of a poem, "Dover;Beach," written in 1876 by Matthew Arnold.;Ah, love, let us be;true;To one another! for;the world, which seems;To lie before us like;a land of dreams;So various, so beautiful;so new;Hath really neither;joy, nor love, nor light;Nor certitude, nor;peace, nor help for pain;And we are here as on;a darkling plain;Swept with confused;alarms of struggle and flight;Where ignorant armies;clash by night.;Which of these statements best describes the remedy Arnold;proposes for the world?;A. In this deceptive world, ignorance requires faith.;B. Our faith in each other can shelter us from deceptive;chaos.;C. Look to your dreams for answers to life's questions.;D. The world may end, but love conquers all.;3. In poetry and fiction, the main reason for using vivid;words is to;A. explain an idea.;B. illustrate the writer's bias.;C. create a mental image.;D. keep the reader guessing.;This question is based on the following poem.;Some say life's a;monopoly game;spread like a picnic;to kill the grass, assuring no winners;save some ants;until amid the fading;rants;none there are to;punch one's pass;into the halls of;fame.;4. The metaphor for life in this poem is;A. a picnic.;B. some ants.;C. a monopoly game.;D. halls of fame.;This question based on the "The Little Match;Girl," which you read in this;study unit.;5. Who is the protagonist in "The Little Match;Girl"?;A. The passerby who finds the little girl's body;B. The little match girl's cruel father;C. The little match girl's grandmother;D. The little match girl;This question is based on the following passage.;Except for a few pigeons, Central Park was deserted. Mist;hung above the chilled grass. Patches of old;snow, scattered here and there, looked like white puddles.;The sun hung just above the horizon, casting red;and orange streaks across low-hanging clouds. The portly;gray-haired gentleman jogging down the path;looked out of place. For one thing, he was dressed in;ordinary street clothes, not a sweat suit. Also, every;few seconds, he looked anxiously back over his shoulder.;Coming closer to me, I saw that his face was;flushed. He was panting, almost gasping. Abruptly, looking;this way and that, he moved behind a tree.;Seeming not to notice my presence, he stood with his back;against the trunk, panting heavily. After a;moment, he poked his head out to survey the path. It was;still empty, except for a squirrel that dashed;across the path like a furry dart. I checked my watch. It;was now 7:30. Mentally marking the time, I aimed;my camera toward the man's face.;6. In this paragraph, a white puddle is a simile for;A. snow.;B. grass.;C. mist.;D. fear.;This question is based on the following sentence.;Detective Simon Levant had the unconscious habit of;caressing his moustache while pondering evidence.;7. Which element of an effective fictional narrative does;this sentence best represent?;A. Conflict;B. PlotC. Theme;D. Characterization;This question is based on the following poem;Seasons are;celebrations.;A year's a Ferris;wheel.;Both honor our;world's habit;of spinning 'round a;star.;8. Which one of the following sentences best expresses the;main idea of this poem?;A. There are four seasons in a year.;B. Season are celebrations, while a year on Earth is a;habit.;C. Seasons and Ferris wheels are like Earth's journey around;the sun.;D. The world has a habit of spinning around.;This question is based on the following paragraph.;(1) After my interview with these four young people, I;reflected on the quiet sense of "difference" I sensed;with many of these Upward Bound students. (2) As a college;teacher who has also taught seventh-grade;science, I have some experience with the faces and attitudes;of adolescence. (3) Upward Bound students;had those faces. (4) There was the puzzled coping with;changing bodies?hormone hell. (5) There was;ambivalence about "authority figures" and;uncertainties about whether or not the world would have some;place for them. (6) There were the studied rationalizations;about lapses on homework assignments;moments of despair, adolescent angst?all of that. (7) But;there was also that "difference." (8) Maybe it's;one part knowing people care and one part beginning to trust;the future. (9) I wasn't sure.;(Turner, "Onward and Upward: Upward Bound Helps Open;College Doors," Virginia Journal of Education;June 1992. Adapted as fair usage.);9. Which sentence in the passage can best be considered;factual?;A. Sentence 2;B. Sentence 4;C. Sentence 5;D. Sentence 3;10. Opinion often shows bias. Therefore, it's good to;remember that a fact is different from an opinion;because a fact can be proved or disproved with;A. evidence.;B. opinions.;C. imagery.;D. bias.;This question is based on the following four sentences.;1. Netta and Jim argued over their views of free trade.2.;Netta and Jim had different views on free trade.;3. Netta and Jim were sharply split over the issue of free trade.;4. Netta and Jim refused to discuss the issue of free trade.;11. Which of the four sentences is not neutral?;A. 2;B. 3;C. 1;D. 4;This question is based on the following passage.;Snow was quickly piling up on the ground. Wind howled;through the trees. Karen wrapped a blanket;around her and sighed as she watched the snow through her;bedroom window.;12. In this passage, you can best infer that;A. Karen doesn't like the snow.;B. Karen thinks the snow is beautiful.;C. Karen is upset because she can't get out.;D. Karen is at home during a snowstorm.;13. Which one of the following statements contains a;metaphor?;A. She was like a bird in a cage.;B. My dream vanished as a puff of smoke.;C. The mighty oak is the king of the forest world.;D. The water shone like a thousand diamonds.;This question is based on the following passage.;Except for a few pigeons, Central Park was deserted. Mist;hung above the chilled grass. Patches of old;snow, scattered here and there, looked like white puddles.;The sun hung just above the horizon, casting red;and orange streaks across low-hanging clouds. The portly;gray-haired gentleman jogging down the path;looked out of place. For one thing, he was dressed in;ordinary street clothes, not a sweat suit. Also, every;few seconds, he looked anxiously back over his shoulder.;Coming closer to me, I saw that his face was;flushed. He was panting, almost gasping. Abruptly, looking;this way and that, he moved behind a tree.;Seeming not to notice my presence, he stood with his back;against the trunk, panting heavily. After a;moment, he poked his head out to survey the path. It was;still empty, except for a squirrel that dashed;across the path like a furry dart. I checked my watch. It;was now 7:30. Mentally marking the time, I aimed;my camera toward the man's face.;14. In this paragraph, at what time of day is the action;taking place?;A. Around sunset;B. Around sunrise;C. Around midnight;D. Around noonThis question based on the "The Little;Match Girl," which you read in this;study unit.;15. What is the setting of "The Little Match;Girl"?;A. A place in the matchseller's imagination;B. The matchseller's attic home;C. A wintry city street;D. The matchseller's grandmother's house;This question is based on the following information about;The Call of the Wild, a book by Jack;London.;The Call of the Wild is a story about a dog named Buck. Buck;is a pampered dog who lives with a wealthy;family in southern California. During the Gold Rush, Buck is;captured, sold, and eventually shipped to;Alaska to work as a sled dog. Along the way, Buck is;mistreated by a series of owners. Eventually he;learns to survive as a member of a dog sled team. As a;result, Buck soon realizes that in the Yukon of;Alaska, "the law of club and fang" is stronger;than the rules of civilized society. With each new experience;Buck becomes more acquainted with his primitive past.;Finally, after losing the one person who treated;Buck well, Buck decides to return to living in the wild.;16. From the information above, which one of the following;headlines would best represent the theme of;Jack London's story?;A. Pampered Dog Moves to Alaska;B. Dog Learns the Ropes of Sled Teams;C. Dog Mistreated by Owners;D. Dog's Roots Call Him Back;This question is based on the following four sentences.;1. Netta and Jim argued over their views of free trade.;2. Netta and Jim had different views on free trade.;3. Netta and Jim were sharply split over the issue of free;trade.;4. Netta and Jim refused to discuss the issue of free trade.;17. In these four sentences, the word that's most obviously;a loaded word is;A. sharply.;B. different.;C. refused.;D. argued.;18. Which one of the following sentences best explains the;term bias?;A. Bias is a negative opinion.;B. Bias is an opinion that favors one point of view.;C. Bias is an interpretation of something.;D. Bias exchanges a negative opinion for a positive one.End;of exam;19. Which one of the following statements contains bias?;A. Charles left for California on the 6:00 A.M. flight.;B. It had rained for three days straight.;C. The employees whined about their low wages.;D. The budget was reduced by $3,000.;This question is based on the following paragraph.;(1) After my interview with these four young people, I;reflected on the quiet sense of "difference" I sensed;with many of these Upward Bound students. (2) As a college;teacher who has also taught seventh-grade;science, I have some experience with the faces and attitudes;of adolescence. (3) Upward Bound students;had those faces. (4) There was the puzzled coping with;changing bodies?hormone hell. (5) There was;ambivalence about "authority figures" and;uncertainties about whether or not the world would have some;place for them. (6) There were the studied rationalizations;about lapses on homework assignments;moments of despair, adolescent angst?all of that. (7) But;there was also that "difference." (8) Maybe it's;one part knowing people care and one part beginning to trust;the future. (9) I wasn't sure.;(Turner, "Onward and Upward: Upward Bound Helps Open;College Doors," Virginia Journal of Education;June 1992. Adapted as fair usage.);20. Which one of the following statements accurately;reflects bias in relation to this passage?;A. The author is biased in favor of the Upward Bound;Program.;B. The author shows no bias.;C. The author is biased against adolescents.;D. The author feels that adolescence is a bad time for;making choices.

 

Paper#54903 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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