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psy110 ch 6 petest

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Question;A research study found that people who look at real visual;images and then are asked to simply imagine looking at visual images;are often unable later to distinguish between the images;they had really seen and the imagined images.;are typically able later to distinguish between the images;they had really seen and the imagined images.;often remember only some of the images.;are often unable to remember any of the images.;2);In a study discussed in the textbook that researched the;effects of different types of information on memory, subjects viewed a slide;presentation of a traffic accident. The actual slide presentation contained a;stop sign, but in a written summary of the presentation, the sign was referred;to as a yield sign. What were the results of this study?;Subjects who were given no information after viewing the;slides were far less accurate in their memories for the kind of sign present;than were subjects who were given misleading information.;Subjects who were given misleading information prior to viewing;the slides were far less accurate in their memories for the kind of sign;present than were subjects who were given no information.;Subjects who were given misleading information prior to;viewing the slides were far more accurate in their memories for the kind of;sign present than were subjects who were given no information.;Subjects who were given misleading information after viewing;the slides were far less accurate in their memories for the kind of sign;present than were subjects who were given no such information.;3);Which of the following best describes psychologist John;Kihlstrom's comments when talking about Bartlett's book on memory?;Memory is more like making up a story than it is like;reading a book.;Memory is more like reading a book than it is like going to;a movie.;Memory is more like reading a book than it is like making up;a story.;Memory is more like a movie than it is like taking a;photograph.;4);Psychologists consider memory to be;a passive storage bank of experiences.;only possible with effort.;limited to encoding sensory information.;an active system.;5);If you move from the United States to England and have;trouble adjusting to driving on the left side of the road, you are;experiencing;proactive interference.;memory trace decay.;retroactive interference.;encoding failure.;6);The phrase "use it or lose it" refers to which;theory of forgetting?;proactive interference;encoding failure;decay;retroactive interference;7);Brenda called Mike while he was in the middle of the meeting;to ask him to pick up some milk on his way home from work. When Mike got home;he didn't have the milk, and Brenda was angry. Mike may have experienced;selective memory.;memory blocking.;anterograde amnesia.;encoding failure.;8);Mrs. Tuttle was 97 years old and suffered from forgetfulness;and mental confusion. She was probably experiencing;retrograde amnesia.;encoding failure.;senile dementia.;anterograde amnesia.;9);The ________ effect suggests that the first and last person;interviewed for a job will be better remembered by the interviewer than all the;people in the middle.;interference;bystander;middle-man;serial position;10);On the Internet, each website has its own specific;information but is also linked to many other related sites. In addition, a;person can have open more than one site at the same time. This pattern of;organization may be very similar to how;the mind organizes the information stored in long-term;memory.;short-term memories are forgotten.;long-term memories are forgotten.;the mind organizes the information stored in short-term;memory.;11);An eyewitness was asked to testify in court about her memory;of a crime that took place on her street. Prior to her testimony, an attorney;provided her with a written statement from another neighbor who had also viewed;the crime. As a result of reading her neighbor's statement, which was different;from her own, the accuracy of her memory was altered, which eventually affected;her testimony. This is an example of;the levels-of-processing model.;the misinformation effect.;hindsight bias.;the curve of forgetting.;12);To help students learn new psychology terms, Professor;Williams encourages the students to think deeply about the meaning of the words;by asking them to provide examples of each term and to use each one in a;sentence. Professor Williams is using which model of memory?;semantic network;levels-of-processing;parallel distributed processing;information-processing;13);Donyelle finds that she performs better on the exams that;are given in her regular psychology classroom than in the large lecture room;that is used to give midterms and finals to several sections at once.;Donyelle?s experience illustrates;the role of the recency effect.;the role of the primacy effect.;the importance of maintenance rehearsal in memory.;the importance of retrieval cues in memory.;14);In the information-processing model, the first stage of memory;is ______ memory.;short-term;iconic;long-term;sensory;15);The most efficient way of transferring short-term memory;into long-term memory is by using;maintenance rehearsal.;rote learning.;elaborative rehearsal.;chunking.;16);is the ability to focus on only one stimulus from;among all sensory input.;Selective attention;Anterograde amnesia;Chunking;Working memory;17);According to Craik and Lockhart, information that is;will be remembered more effectively and for a longer period of time.;repeated many times;deeply processed;processed according to the sound of the physical;characteristics of the words;read;18);What is the best way for a person to overcome the;tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon?;Think about the length of the word or concept.;Think about words that may sound like the word you are;trying to retrieve.;Stop trying to remember the information you are trying to;retrieve.;Name the letters that start or end the word.;19);Elizabeth Loftus' research determined that;eyewitness testimony is generally accurate and reliable.;people tend to forget memories that are painful.;what people see and hear about an event after the fact can;easily affect the accuracy of their memories of that event.;flashbulb memories are rarely an accurate memory of the;actual event.;20);The fact that everyone remembers that George Washington was;the first president points to the primacy effect as a result of;recognition.;short-term memory storage.;state-dependent learning.;long-term memory storage.;21);Why do flashbulb memories seem so vivid and exact?;Emotional reactions seem to stimulate a person's ability to;engage in elaborative rehearsal that is known to enhance the formation of;sensory memories.;Emotional reactions seem to stimulate the release of;hormones that have been shown to enhance the formation of sensory memories.;Emotional reactions seem to stimulate the release of;hormones that have been shown to enhance the formation of long-term memories.;Emotional reactions seem to stimulate a person's ability to;engage in elaborative rehearsal that is known to enhance the formation of;long-term memories.;22);The _______ is the part of the brain that is responsible for;the formation of new long-term declarative memories.;hypothalamus;pons;cerebellum;hippocampus;23);In one study with depressed patients who were being treated;with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), patients were tested for their memory of;certain television programs both before and after the treatment. What was the;result?;Patients' memories of programs were not affected.;Patients forgot older programs but remembered more recent;ones.;Patients forgot programs in a random pattern.;Patients forgot more recent programs but remembered older;ones.;24);Ebbinghaus's ________ shows that forgetting happens quickly;within the first hour, and then tapers off gradually.;curve of forgetting;distributed practice theory;encoding failure theory;interference theory;25);A(n) ________ is a memory expert or someone with exceptional;memory ability.;phlebotomist;memorist;amnesic;mnemonist

 

Paper#59556 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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