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APUS MATH302 Q2

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Question;Question 1 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Sue has 10 pictures but only has;space in her apartment to hang 4 of them on a wall. The number of different;arrangements of four pictures from a selection of ten pictures is;Question 2 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;If A and B are any two events;with P(A) =.8 and P(B|A) =.4, then the joint probability of A and B is;Question 3 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;A gumball machine contains 300;grape flavored balls, 400 cherry flavored balls, and 500 lemon flavored;balls. What is the probability of getting 1 grape ball, 1 cherry ball, and;1 lemon ball if each ball was removed and then replaced before choosing the;next from the machine?;Question 4 of 20;0.0/;1.0 Points;If P(A) = P(A|B), then events A;and B are said to be;Question 5 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;A jar contains four white;marbles, five red marbles, and six black marbles. If a marble is selected;at random, find the probability that it is white or black.;Part 2 of 6 -;4.0/;5.0 Points;Question 6 of 20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Suppose that 50 identical;batteries are being tested. After 8 hours of continuous use, assume that a;given battery is still operating with a probability of 0.70 and has failed;with a probability of 0.30.;What is the probability that greater than 30 batteries will last at least 8;hours?;Question 7 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;The following data were obtained;from a survey of college students. The variableXrepresents;the number of non-assigned books read during the past six months.;x;0;1;2;3;4;5;P(X=x);0.20;0.25;0.20;0.15;0.10;0.10;What is the standard deviation of X?;Question 8 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Suppose that 50 identical;batteries are being tested. After 8 hours of continuous use, assume that a;given battery is still operating with a probability of 0.70 and has failed;with a probability of 0.30.;What is the probability that greater than 40 batteries will last at least 8;hours?;Question 9 of 20;1.0/;1.0 Points;A die is rolled 360 times. Find;the standard deviation for the number of 3s that will be rolled.;Question 10 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;A pet supplier has a stock of;parakeets of which 10% are blue parakeets. A pet store orders 3;parakeets from this supplier. If the supplier selects the parakeets at;random, what is the chance that the pet store gets exactly one blue;parakeet?;Part 3 of 6 -;4.0/;4.0 Points;Question 11 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;The following data were obtained;from a survey of college students. The variableXrepresents;the number of non-assigned books read during the past six months.;x;0;1;2;3;4;5;6;P(X=x);0.55;0.15;0.10;0.10;0.04;0.03;0.03;What is the variance of X? Place your answer, rounded to two decimal;places in the blank. For example, 4.56 would be a legitimate entry.;Question 12 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;Find;the mean of the following probability distribution?;1;0.20;2;0.10;3;0.35;4;0.05;5;0.30;Place your answer, rounded to two decimal places;in the blank. When entering your answer do not use any;labels or symbols other than a decimal point. Simply provide the;numerical value. For example, 1.23 would be a legitimate entry.;Question 13 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;A DVD rental business determines that customers will rent X number of DVDs;according to the following distribution;Number of DVDs rented X;1;2;3;4;5;Probability P(X);0.15;0.25;0.3;0.25;0.05;What is the mean number of DVDs that customers rent? Round your answer;to one decimal place as necessary. For example, 4.5 would be a legitimate entry.;Question 14 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;In a survey, 55% of the voters support a particular referendum. If 40;voters are chosen at random, and X is the number of voters that support;this referendum, find the mean and variance of X. Place the mean in the;first blank and place the variance in the second blank.;Part 4 of 6 -;0.0/;4.0 Points;Question 15 of;20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;An ice cream vendor sells three;flavors: chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla. Forty five percent of the;sales are chocolate, while 30% are strawberry, with the rest vanilla;flavored. Sales are by the cone or the cup. The percentages of cones sales;for chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla, are 75%, 60%, and 40%;respectively. For a randomly selected sale, define the following events;=;chocolate chosen;=;strawberry chosen;=;vanilla chosen;= ice;cream on a cone;ice cream in a cup;Find the probability that the;ice cream was vanilla flavor, given that it was sold in a cup.Placeyour;answer, rounded to 4 decimal places, in the blank. For exampe, 0.3456 would;be a legitimate entry.;Question 16 of;20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;An ice cream vendor sells three;flavors: chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla. Forty five percent of the;sales are chocolate, while 30% are strawberry, with the rest vanilla;flavored. Sales are by the cone or the cup. The percentages of cones sales;for chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla, are 75%, 60%, and 40%;respectively. For a randomly selected sale, define the following events;=;chocolate chosen;=;strawberry chosen;=;vanilla chosen;= ice cream;on a cone;ice cream in a cup;Find the probability that the;ice cream was strawberry flavor, given that it was sold on a cone.Placeyour;answer, rounded to 4 decimal places, in the blank. For exampe, 0.3456 would;be a legitimate entry.;Question 17 of;20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For scientific;notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;A particular brand of women's jeans is available in seven different sizes;three different colors, and three different styles. How many different;jeans does the store manager need to order to have one pair of each type of;jean? Place your answer in the blank. Do not use any decimal places or;commas. For example, 45 would be a legitimate entry.;Question 18 of;20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Accepted characters: numbers, decimal point markers (period or comma), sign;indicators (-), spaces (e.g., as thousands separator, 5 000), "E;or "e" (used in scientific notation). NOTE: For;scientific notation, a period MUST be used as the decimal point;marker.;Complex numbers should be in the form (a + bi) where "a" and;b" need to have explicitly stated values.;For example: {1+1i} is valid whereas {1+i} is not. {0+9i} is valid whereas;{9i} is not.;The president of a bank is attempting to arrange a meeting with the three;vice presidents for a Friday weekly meeting. He believes that each of these;three busy individuals, independently of the others, has about 40% chance;of being able to attend the meeting. If the meeting will be held only if;every vice president can attend, what is the probability that the meeting;will take place? Place your answer, rounded to 3 decimal places, in the;blank. For example, 0.123 would be a legitimate entry.;Part 5 of 6 -;0.0/;1.0 Points;Question 19 of;20;0.0/;1.0 Points;Given that events A and B are;independent and that P(A) = 0.8 and P(B|A) = 0.4, then P(A and B) = 0.32.;Part 6 of 6 -;1.0/;1.0 Points;Question 20 of;20;1.0/;1.0 Points;The variance of a binomial;distribution for which n = 50 and p = 0.20 is 8.0.

 

Paper#60254 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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