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Calculate the total price to purchase all the components required to build a state-of-the-art gaming computer from components available

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;;Homework 2;Instructions;Selection statements;In this homework, you will design a program to perform the following task;Calculate the total price to purchase all the components required to build a state-of-the-art gaming computer from components available on the internet.;Before attempting this exercise, be sure you have completed all of chapter 3 and course module readings, participated in the weekly conferences, and thoroughly understand the examples throughout the chapter. As before, there are 3 main components of your submission including the problem analysis, program design and documentation, and sample test data.;Using a similar approach as example 3.6 (textbook page 146): ?A new Car Price Calculator?, provide your analysis for the following problem statement: You need to write a program that will calculate the total price to purchase all the components required to build a state-of-the-art gaming computer from newegg.com. You will need to conduct some analysis on newegg.com (or amazon.com) regarding the possible options and prices to be considered. However, assume the computer will consist of the following components;CPU;Case;Power supply;Motherboard;Hard Drive;RAM;DVD;Sound Card;Monitor;Graphics Card;Operating System;I would recommend you keep the option choices limited to 3 different components, or your program will really grow fast. For example, you could provide options for the Operating System (Windows 7, Red Hat Linux), the RAM (4 MB, 8 MB, 12 MB) and the Hard Drive Size (500 GB, 1 TB, 1.5 TB) and leave everything else as a baseline. I leave it up to you to determine which components you want to add options for and for researching the approximate prices. Be sure your prices are fairly realistic.;Your analysis should be clearly written and demonstrate your thought process and steps used to analyze the problem. Be sure to include what is the required output? What is the necessary input and how you will obtain the required output from the given input? Also, include your variable names and definitions. Be sure to describe the necessary formulas and sample calculations that might be needed.;Using a similar approach as example 3.6 (textbook page 146): ?A new Car Price Calculator?, provide your program design for the program you analyzed for calculating the total price of your gaming computer. Be sure to describe the fundamental tasks (i.e., things your program must do) needed to solve the problem so you can use a modular design. Provide pseudocode of your overall design that includes the Main module and the order of the module calls (see page 148 for an example) and a Hierarchy chart for the computer price calculator (see figure 3.8 page 148). Finally, list all of your pseudocode for each module. (See pages148-150 as an example.);Include header and step comments in your pseudocode, using a similar approach as the example provided in section 2.3 (textbook page 86). See example 2.8 on pages 87-88).;Prepare at least 5 sets of input data (Test data) along with their expected output for testing your program. Your test data can be presented in the form of a table as was shown in Assignment 1. Be sure that you provide expected output for each test case.;Rubric Name: Assignment Rubric;Criteria;Exceeds;Meets;Does not meet;Design;20 points;(18-20 points);Employs Modularity (including proper use of parameters, use of local variables etc.) most of the time;Employs correct & appropriate use of programming structures (loops, conditionals, classes etc.) most of the time;Efficient algorithms used most of the time;17 points;(15-17 points);Employs Modularity (including proper use of parameters, use of local variables etc.) some of the time;Employs correct & appropriate use of programming structures (loops, conditionals, classes etc.) some of the time;Efficient algorithms used some of the time;14 points;(0-14 points);Rarely employs Modularity (including proper use of parameters, use of local variables etc.);Rarely employs correct & appropriate use of programming structures (loops, conditionals, classes etc.);Poorly structured and inefficient algorithms;Functionality;40 points;(36-40 points);Program fulfills all functionality;All requirements were fulfilled;Extra effort was apparent;35 points;(29-35 points);Program fulfills most functionality;Most requirements were fulfilled;28 points;(0-28 points);Program does not fulfill functionality;Few requirements were fulfilled;Test;20 points;(18-20 points);Comprehensive test plan;17 points;(15-17 points);Good test plan included;14 points;(0-14 points);No test plan included;Documentation;20 points;(18-20 points);Excellent comments;Comprehensive lessons learned;Excellent possible improvements included;Excellent approach discussion and references;17 points;(15-17 points);Good comments;Some lessons learned;Some possible improvements included;Some approach discussion;14 points;(0-14 points);No comments;No lessons learned;No possible improvements;No approach discussion;Overall Score;Exceed;90 or more;Meets;70 or more;Does not meet;0 or more;\;EXAMPLE FROM BOOK;3.6 Focus on Problem Solving;A New Car Price Calculator;In each ?Focus on Problem Solving? section throughout this textbook, we will develop a longer program that makes use of much of the material in the current chapter. The program developed here contains selection structures and menus to help compute the cost of a new car purchased with various options.;Problem Statement;Universal Motors makes cars. They compute the purchase price of their autos by taking the base price of the vehicle, adding in various costs of different options, and then adding shipping and dealer charges. The shipping and dealer charges are fixed for each vehicle at $500 and $175, respectively, but regardless of the particular model, and the buyer can select the following options: type of engine, type of interior trim, and type of radio. The various choices for each option and the associated prices are listed in Table 3.4.;Table 3.4 Options available for Universal Motors? vehicles;Engine Purchase Code Price;6 cylinder S $150;8 cylinder E $475;Diesel D $750;Interior Trim Purchase Code Price;Vinyl V $50;Cloth C $225;Leather L $800;Radio Purchase Code Price;AM/FM/CD/DVD C $100;With GPS P $400;Universal Motors would like to have a program that inputs the base price of a vehicle and the desired options from the user, and then displays the selling price of that vehicle.;Problem Analysis;This problem has very clearly defined input and output. The input consists of the base price (BasePrice), the engine choice (EngineChoice), the interior trim choice (TrimChoice), and the radio choice (RadioChoice). After the user has entered a choice for an option, the program must determine the corresponding cost of that option: EngineCost, TrimCost, and RadioCost.;The only item output is the selling price (SellingPrice) of the vehicle. To determine sellingprice, the program must also know the fixed value of the shipping and dealer charges (ShippingCharge and DealerCharge). Then the following computation is simple: SellingPrice = BasePrice + EngineCost + TrimCost + RadioCost + ShippingCharge + DealerCharge;Program Design;Roughly speaking, the following are the things our program must do;1. Input the base price;2. Process the various option choices to compute additional costs;3. Total all the costs;4. Display the final selling price;We will input the base price in the main module and the transfer control to several submodules, one for each available option. Within each submodule, a menu will be displayed allowing the user to enter a choice for that option (See Table 3.4). Then the submodule will use this selection to determine the corresponding option cost. After all the option selections are made, another module will compute the total cost and display the results. Thus the Main module will contain the following submodules.;? Compute_Engine_Cost;? Compute_Interior_Trim_Cost;? Compute_Radio_Cost;? Display_Selling_Price;The hierarchy chart shown in Figure 3.8 shows the program modules and their relationship to one another. We now describe each of the modules in more detail.;Main Module;This module displays a welcome message, inputs the base price, and calls the other modules. In the Main module we also declare all the variables that will be used by more than one module. The pseudocode for the Main module follows

 

Paper#68853 | Written in 18-Jul-2015

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